Category Archives: garden

Outdoor, Open-Air Profile Portrait Photographs

Outdoor Open-Air Profile Portraits the Benefits of Getting Out

A greater awareness of space might be one of the lasting legacies of the COVID crisis. Not the ‘space’ which Captain Kirk urged us to boldly got to, I mean the space around us, open air and light, the breeze in your air and sun on your face. Not just the first, crucial two metres.

After being stuck indoors for all that time, anything and anyone outdoors can look more appealing. So a profile picture shot in the open air is almost sure to have a positive, open feel. In a park, the countryside or the garden there’s an association with nature, growth, development, the environment and sustainability. In the town or city, the tone is cutting-edge, cosmopolitan, modern, youthful, fashion-conscious or gritty.

Outdoor, open-air profile portrait photographs are just more interesting than those taken in a studio. (Believe me, I’ve taken plenty of dull studio portraits!) But shooting in a studio with flash has one big advantage – control. You can guarantee the subject will be getting a good profile portrait photograph after the session, and the photographer can know before the session starts what the picture will look like. That can not be true of a photo session in the open air, there are too many variables.

So how can we reduce the risks implicit in booking an outdoor profile portrait photography session? Forethought is the answer, thinking it through, discussing and agreeing on the options, depending on the conditions and locations found on the day.

Weather

With the best will in the world, you can’t shoot in the rain, snow or wind. If the forecast looks bad, postpone in good time to a later date.

Light

Daylight can give lovely, flattering soft light. Sunshine give harsh deep shadows and a squint.

Background

Whether it’s a natural or urban background, it should be thrown out of focus to avoid being a distraction. It can also give depth to the image or provide a frame around the subject

Other people

A busy location reduces control and predictability, passers-by might make the subject uncomfortable or clutter the background.

Time of day

The light changes as the sun moves across the sky affecting its nature and direction. The number of people and the amount of traffic will vary according to time of day.


Headshot Photography

The Limbcare Garden Video Story

Video of a Hampton Court Flower Show Garden

The story that the Limbcare Garden video tells has more emotion at it’s core than most business video. That’s because the Limbcare Garden at the Hampton Court Flower Show was inspired by the emotional response of the garden’s designer, Edward Mairis. He learned of Ray Edwards MBE, the UK’s Longest surviving quad amputee and his dream to build the Limbcare Well-Being Centre to support amputees and the limb-impaired.  Edward’s garden was intended to help the fund-raising and eventually enrich the experience of the centre. Edward’s first show garden at the Hampton Court Flower Show, ‘Journey of Lifetime’ was awarded a Bronze Medal by the Royal Horticultural Association. This year the RHA gave Limbcare Garden a Silver Medal.

 
designer Edward Mairis says:

 

“The judges recognised the Limbcare Garden as outstanding because it brings a message of hope to amputees and their families who have the huge challenge of accepting a dramatically changed life. The garden symbolises how the charity gives hope and security. Within this calming space, the amputee can face up to what has happened to them and then learn to think differently about what’s important in life. The garden offers a sense of hope in the healing process, the verve of nature showing great resilience, growth and adaptability to the amputee.

“It was important to us to involve amputees in the creation of the garden. This has been another example of the way that Ray inspires and motivates other amputees, and I am delighted to have had the support of so many people Limbcare has supported over the years.”

Filming with Ray and the other limb-impaired volunteers was a joy and an inspiration.
 
 

Journey of Life – Promotional Garden Design Video at RHS Hampton Court Flower Show

garden design video exhibition photographer Hampton CourtI stopped shooting for my garden design video, picked up my camera and tripod and got out of the way of the BBC’s double-decker sized camera crane. It was the Royal Horticultural Society’s Hampton Court Flower Show 2017. The camera crane belonged to ‘Gardner’s World’, one of my favourite television programmes, so I was more than happy to move. I had to step inside the RSPB stand to get out of the way, and had a nice chat about bird feeders.

Like me, Gardener’s World were filming ‘Journey of Life’, a garden designed and created by Edward Mairis. Unlike me, the BBC had a large crew recording pictures throughout the show for the TV programmes. I was a little intimidated, partly because it was their filming style that I was attempting to emulate.

Creating a Marketing Asset

Edward’s marketing consultant Lisa Woodward had encouraged him to make the video when she saw how wonderful the garden was. So, my commission to make the film came just a few days before the opening. Spending a day in a garden filming flowers – what a joy. Gentle tracks past colourful flower beds. Dramatically craning up over a tree, or pulling focus from one bloom to another. These are the sort of shots that typify BBC coverage of garden show. I love them, but I was working on my own with equipment a lot more modest than the BBC’s, so I had to adjust my pictorial ambition.

The objective for the film was to reflect the connections Edward had created between the garden and the poem, so I had to be sure I had all the footage I needed to do it. Edward felt the film succeeded, to quote the message he left on my voicemail – ‘Love it, love it, love it…’.

garden design video Hampton Court event photographer

The Royal Horticultural Society Awarded Edward a bronze medal