Tag Archives: seasons

Love the Autumn – Do Photography!

sunbeams in an autumn forest Trevor Aston PhotographySummer has holidays, winter has Christmas. Autumn, sandwiched in between has nothing but colour.  But, oh! What colour

moss and ivy-covered cottage in autumn Trevor Aston PhotographyAutumn’s the best. Yes, photography in spring is beautiful when everything bursting into life. Winter is wonderful in its sharpness and starkness. And of course, long, sultry, summer days are magnificent. But Autumn? Autumn is golden, it’s crunchy underfoot and smells of sweet wood smoke and musty damp leaves, it’s the sensual season. We should love autumn.

Autumn should be walked in, listened to, breathed and touched. Autumn is definitely a time for photography. In fact, producing half a dozen good pictures of rich, autumn colours should be compulsory for anyone with a camera.

The colours are fantastic – the oranges, reds, yellows and browns. All made more spectacular by the light from the sun shining low in the sky, streaming through the trees, punching out the colour. Unless, in the dark of the night, the chilling mist has risen to shroud the landscape in mystery.

Bloated spiders spin colossal webs, strung with tiny lenses made from morning dew, focusing sunbeams into lines of fairy lights. While birds come back to the gardens searching for treats to fatten them up for winter, squirrels scamper through branches and flower beds burying family-packs of conkers and acorns.

The camera might almost have been invented for autumn – a tool for saving splendours to savour in the grey of winter.

bench in Bushy Park Teddington Trevor Aston photography

Stag in Bushy Park Teddington Trevor Aston Photography

The Lords of London’s Bushy Park, the growling grouches, noses in the air, nostrils twitching, sniffing for rivals, strutting stags watching over their herd.



Six beautiful words to describe autumn

Can you identify these autumn leaves?

Find your nearest National Trust property to enjoy autumn colours

10 mindful walks to enjoy in the autumn


What to do with a Camera in Winter

Get more creative, that’s what!

tall trees under a blue winter sky

explore the structure of trees

What to do with a camera in winter is the question many photographers seem to ask themselves. The autumn is irresistible to most photographers. With the passing of the rutting season in the Royal Parks of London, the herds of stag-shooting photographers have retired to the warmth of their computers. Which is a pity because photography in winter offers some great opportunities for creativity.
ice on a pond

The patterns in ice and the reflections of the trees can make some fantastic patterns

For instance, with each gust of wind and flurry of leaves the trees are getting ever more naked. Look up at the shapes of their bare limbs, who knows what inspiration you may get! Nature’s putting on her drab winter coat, but there’s so much texture and pattern in the bark, or in the fallen foliage in ponds and streams. The mist and fog is a cloak of mystery that can utterly change a landscape.
I love the frost, especially when the sun comes and everything sparkles. In a proper freeze ice throws incredible designs across standing water and creates amazing sculptures around running and tumbling water. For those who care to look, it’s all there in the parks.
Winter is also a great time to photograph the built environment. The sun never gets high in the sky so when it does come out it casts huge, dramatic shadows. The sun creeps into the nooks and crannies of our townscape that never see it in the summer, illuminating surface textures and the rich colours of stone and brickwork. After sunset man-made lightshows fill the streets with twinkling jewels, particularly around the shops at Christmas. The open-air markets make vibrant subjects with their steaming food stalls, colourful products and characterful faces. Even the traffic going home has a romantic appeal as the stoplights of braking vehicles string rubies along the road.

freezing water in a woodland brook

it’s been freezing for days and the ice has grown like glassy fruits

I got very excited when it snowed and spent several days sliding around hoping not to fall on my camera. When it snows, everywhere is quieter, softer, somehow transformed. On it’s own, snow is a challenge for the camera in winter. It takes good light to make snow into a good picture – something that can create form and texture out of what is potentially just a white sheet. But look at the people. The smiles and rosy cheeks of those enjoying the snow make marvelous pictures. Young children’s sheer wonderment, noses tipped with a dew-drop, laughing office workers snowballing in their suits. Photograph the brief lives of snowmen before they melt away, sledge pilots before they tumble into a drift and leaping dogs as they catch a snowball. But watch out for snowball fights lest you become a target!

 

 

These blogs have some ideas – winter photography ideas, winter photography projects. This one has tips on photographing ice.